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Andergrove

Andergrove is a locality in the Mackay Region, Queensland, Australia and a suburb of Mackay. In the 2011 census, Andergove had a population of 9,372 people.

Fast Facts about Andergrove
    Andergrove has been steadily growing as a suburban community since 1990s and the housing stock is mostly low-set brick homes.
    The Andergrove State School opened on 21 February 1939. The Pioneer State High School opened on 28 January 1986. At that time, Andergrove was in the Pioneer Shire, which was amalgamated into City of Mackay in 1994.
    The Andergrove State School opened on 21 February 1939. The Pioneer State High School opened on 28 January 1986. At that time, Andergrove was in the Pioneer Shire, which was amalgamated into City of Mackay in 1994.

    Beaconsfield

    Beaconsfield is a suburb of Mackay Region, Queensland, Australia. It is located 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) north of Mackay. At the 2011 census, it had a population of 4,934.

     

    Fast Facts about Beaconsfield
      The suburb was named after the Beaconsfield sugar plantation. It had a sugar crushing mill from about 1882 to 1893. The Mackay Golf Club was established in 1928. It is located on the Mackay-Buchasia Road.
      Beaconsfield State School was opened on 1 January 1999. The C&K Beaconsfield Community Kindergarten is on-site at the Beaconsfield State School. The Mackay District Special School, formerly Kewarra State Special School, is also located in Beaconsfield and opened on 21 February, 1987. It is available for students with a diverse range of abilities and special education requirements from Prep to Year 12.

      East Mackay

      East Mackay is a coastal suburb of Mackay in the Mackay Region, Queensland, Australia.

      Fast Facts about East Mackay
        As the name suggests, East Mackay is the suburb to the east of the city centre. It is flat low-lying coastal land (less than 10 metres above sea level). It is bounded by the Pioneer River to the north and the Coral Sea to the east. There is a sandy beach along the foreshore to the sea known as Town Beach. It is possible to swim there at high tide, but, as the tide goes out, extensive mudflats are revealed. The suburb is mostly used for residential purposes except for the northern part of the suburb at the mouth of the Pioneer River, which is a wetland known as the Sandfly Creek Environmental Reserve and managed by the Mackay Regional Council. The wetland serves a number of purposes, acting as a levee against coastal erosion, providing a habitat for shorebirds and other fauna, and providing a walking track for visitors.
        Victoria Park State School opened on 1 July 1926. On 27 January 1970, the school was divided to create a separate Victoria Park State Infants School for the early years of schooling, but on 16 December 1994 the infants school was merged back into the main school.
        Info Here
        Victoria Park State School is a primary (P-6) school for boys and girls operated by the Queensland Government on the north-east corner of Goldsmith Street and Shakespeare Street. In 2016, the school had an enrolment of 612 students with 48 teachers (45 full-time equivalent) and 36 non-teaching staff (23 full-time equivalent).

        Bucasia

        Bucasia is a coastal town and one of the largest suburbs of Mackay in the Mackay Region, Queensland, Australia. In the 2011 census, Bucasia had a population of 4,257 people.

        Fast Facts about Bucasia
          Bucasia is a northern coastal suburb of Mackay. The coastline forms its eastern boundary. Eimeo Creek forms the south-east boundary. The largest residential area is along the sandy beachfront with a second residential area along the road to Mackay. The bulk of the locality is used for growing sugarcane and tropical fruit, while some of the locality (particularly surrounding the creeks) is left as swampy wetlands.
          In 1874, Bucasia was originally called Marara but was later named Seaview. In 1938, it was decided that there were too many places called Seaview and so it was renamed Bucasia after Father Pierre-Marie (Paul) Bucas (born in 1840 in Saint-Jean-la-Poterie;Morbihan in France), the first Roman Catholic priest in Mackay. Starting in 1874, Father Bucas acquired 1680 acres of land through a series of purchases in present-day Bucasia, which he used to establish a community for displaced Aborigines. He also established the St Joseph's orphanage, operated by the Sisters of St Joseph until 1880, after which it was run by the Sisters of Mercy. In 1884, concerns about malaria resulted in the orphans being relocated in 1885 to the Meteor Park orphanage near Rockhampton (later known as Neerkol). The swamp in the west of the Bucasia locality is still known as Orphanage Swamp. Over time, Bucasia developed as a holiday area but has now become a permanent residential area. Bucasia State School opened on 29 January 1985. In 1988, a memorial to Father Bucas was unveiled on Bucasia Esplanade. In 2008, the Mackay Regional Council constructed a waste water treatment plant in Bucasia, serving the northern suburbs. The two basin sequencing batch reactor can process up to 4 megalitres per day. In 2015, illegal tree clearing occurred on Bucasia foreshore, a problem in many coastal communities where foreshore trees block residential views. The trees were planted to stabilise the dunes, protect the beach, and provide habitat for wildlife.
          The beach has a northly aspect with views to the Cumberland Islands. It is protected from strong winds and is one of Mackay's most popular beaches. The beach is a nesting site for the flatback turtle with an average of 16 nests each year. Bucasia State School at 76 Kemp Street is a government co-educational primary school (Prep to Year 6). In 2014, the school had 329 students with 20 teachers (19 equivalent full-time). The Mackay Regional Council operates a mobile library service on a fortnightly schedule on the Esplanade near Steen Avenue.

          Glenella

          Glenella is a town and suburb in the Mackay Region, Queensland, Australia. In the 2011 census, Glenella had a population of 4,633 people.

          Fast Facts about Glenella
            Glenella State School opened on 1 April 1912. A school was originally established in 1879 and was renamed Glenella State School in 1912

            Hampden

            Hampden is a locality in the Mackay Region, Queensland, Australia.

            Fast Facts about Hampden
              Hampden State School opened on 9 May 1887. It caters for students from Prep to Year 6. A postal receiving office opened at Hampden on 21 August 1884, became a post office in August 1904 and closed on 14 October 1924.

              Mackay

              Mackay is a city and its centre suburb in the Mackay Region on the eastern coast of Queensland, Australia. It is located about 970 kilometres (603 mi) north of Brisbane, on the Pioneer River. Mackay is nicknamed the sugar capital of Australia because its region produces more than a third of Australia’s sugar.

              There is controversy about the location of the region for administrative purposes, with most people referring to it as a part of either Central Queensland or North Queensland. Indeed, much confusion lies within the Queensland Government, with government services being provided through both Townsville (North Queensland) and Rockhampton (Central Queensland). Generally, the area is known as the Mackay–Whitsunday Region.

              Fast Facts about Mackay
                Mackay is situated on the 21st parallel south on the banks of the Pioneer River. The Clarke Range lies to the west of the city. The city is expanding to accommodate for growth with most of the expansion happening in the Beachside, Southern, Central and Pioneer Valley suburbs. Suburbs to the North of the city such as Midge Point are also fast growing with residential estates in demand.
                The area which is now Mackay City was originally inhabited by the local Yuibera people. One of the first white settlers to travel through the Mackay region was Captain James Cook, who reached the Mackay coast on 1 June 1770 and named several local landmarks, including Cape Palmerston, Slade Point and Cape Hillsborough. It was during this trip that the Endeavour's botanist, Sir Joseph Banks, briefly recorded seeing Aboriginal people. In 1860, John Mackay led an expedition to the Pioneer Valley and was the first European to visit the area now named after him. In 1918, Mackay was hit by a major tropical cyclone causing severe damage and loss of life with hurricane-force winds and a large storm surge. The resulting death toll was further increased by an outbreak of bubonic plague. The foundation stone of the Mackay War Memorial was laid on the river bank on 18 November 1928 by the mayor George Albert Milton. It was unveiled on 1 May 1929 by the mayor. Due to flooding, the memorial was relocated to Jubilee Park in 1945. Due to the construction of the Civic Centre, it was relocated to another part of the park in March 1973. The largest loss of life in an Australian aircraft accident was a B17 aircraft, with 40 of 41 people on board perishing, on 14 June 1943, after departing from Mackay Aerodrome, and crashing in the Bakers Creek area. The Rats of Tobruk Memorial commemorates those who died at and since the Battle of Tobruk. The memorial was dedicated on 4 March 2001.
                Panoramic image from pathway to Rats of Tobruk memorial in Queen's Park, Mackay
                On 18 February 1958, Mackay was hit with massive flooding caused by heavy rainfall upstream with 878 mm of rain falling at Finch Hatton in 24 hours. The flood peaked at 9.14 metres (29.99 ft). The water flowed down the valley and flooded Mackay within hours. Residents were rescued off rooftops by boats and taken to emergency accommodation. The flood broke Australian records. On 15 February 2008, almost exactly 50 years from the last major flood, Mackay was devastated by severe flooding caused by over 600 mm of rain in 6 hours with around 2000 homes affected. Mackay was battered by Tropical Cyclone Ului, a category three cyclone which crossed the coast at nearby Airlie Beach, around 1:30 am on Sunday 21 March 2010. Over 60,000 homes lost power and some phone services also failed during the storm, but no deaths were reported. The Dudley Denny City Library opened in 2016.
                The Mackay Base Hospital in West Mackay, about 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) from the city centre, is the main hospital for Central Queensland and has recently undergone extensive upgrades. The Mater Hospital, and the Mackay Specialist Day Hospital are in the city's north. The Pioneer Valley Hospital, which had initially ceased operating, has been converted into an injury rehabilitation center. The Queensland Department of Education has 11 primary schools and 4 high schools in Mackay. High schools include Pioneer State High School, Mackay State High School, Mackay North State High School, Mackay Northern Beaches State High School and Mirani State High School. One of the primary schools, Eungella State School was opened on 31 January 1928. Another primary school, Mackay North State School opened on 23 March 1915. The school celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2015. The private system encompasses five primary schools, Beaconsfield State School, Eimeo Road State School, Bucasia State School, Andergrove State School and secondary college, two P-12 colleges, one P-10 college, one 7–10 college and St Patrick's College – the state's only 11–12 college. The Mackay campus of Central Queensland University is in the outer suburb of Ooralea, while the local campus of James Cook University is in South Mackay. The city is also home to a TAFE (technical/vocational) college, which is in the south of the inner city. The Mackay Regional Council operates the Dudley Denny City Library at 134 Victoria Street.

                North Mackay

                North Mackay is a suburb of Mackay in the Mackay Region, Queensland, Australia.

                Although in present times North Mackay is an officially and precisely bounded area, historically and in informal use the term “North Mackay” or “Mackay North” may refer to any part of Mackay north of the Pioneer River.

                Fast Facts about North Mackay
                  As the name suggests, North Mackay is the suburb to the north of the central suburb of Mackay, separated by the Pioneer River. The suburb is bounded by Norris Road to the west, the Mackay Harbour branch of the North Coast railway to the north, Vines Creek to the east and Barnes Creek and the Pioneer River to the south. Harbour Road passes through the east of the suburb and is the arterial access to the harbour. The suburb is predominantly residential although there are a some small industrial areas in the suburb. The suburb also has a number of community facilities, including numerous schools and the Mater Misericordiae Hospital.
                  The Ormond Private Hospital was established by Dr Charles Emmanuel Williams on the corner of Brisbane and Gordon Street. It opened in May 1911. It was purchased in May 1927 by the Sisters of Mercy who renamed it the Mackay Mater Misericordiae Hospital (Mater Misericordiae translates to Mother of Mercy and was the name used by many hospitals established by this religious order). On Sunday 29 May 1927 the hospital was blessed by the Roman Catholic Bishop of Rockhampton, Joseph Shiel. On 9 August 1936, the Sisters opened a new hospital on Gordon Street with a ceremony conducted by the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Brisbane, James Duhig assisted by the Bishop of Rockhampton, Romuald Denis Hayes. In 2003, a modern Mater Hospital was opened in Willett Street, North Mackay, with 105 beds. Mackay North State School opened on 23 March 1915. It should not be confused with Glenalla State School which was originally opened in 1879 under the name Mackay North State School but was renamed Glenalla State School in 1912. Mackay North State School opened on 23 March 1915.  St Joseph's Catholic Primary School opened on 1 August 1936. North Mackay State High School opened on 28 January 1964. Fitzgerald State School opened on 30 January 1979. Mackay Christian College opened on 1 February 1984.
                  Mackay North State School is a government co-educational primary school (P-6) on the corner of Evans Avenue and Harvey Street. In 2016, the school had an enrolment of 395 students with 33 teachers (17 full-time equivalent) and 17 non-teaching staff (12 equivalent full-time). Mackay North State High School is a government co-educational secondary school (7-12) in Valley Street. In 2016, the school had an enrolment of 1345 students with 111 teachers (106 full-time equivalent) and 48 non-teaching staff (37 full-time equivalent).

                  Rural View

                  Rural View is a suburb of Mackay, Queensland, Australia, 11.5 km north of central Mackay. In the 2011 census, Rural View had a population of 3,324 people.

                  Fast Facts about Rural View
                    Rural View was officially named in 1999, although its primary school, Eimeo Road State School, dates back to 1934.
                    Its primary school, Eimeo Road State School, is the largest primary school in the Mackay Region, Whitsunday Region and Isaac Region. It opened on 5 February 1934. In 2014, the student enrolment was 942 with 61 teachers (52 full-time equivalent). Mackay Northern Beaches State High School was opened in Rosewood Drive on 1 January 2013 and is one of the newest high schools in Queensland. In 2014, the student enrolment was 390 with 37 teachers (35 equivalent full-time). They have a range of new technologies and resources of the 21st century.

                    Shoal Point

                    Shoal Point is a coastal suburb of Mackay in the Mackay Region, Queensland, Australia.

                    Fast Facts about Shoal Point
                      The Mackay Regional Council operates a mobile library service on a fortnightly schedule at O'Brien Esplanade.

                      URGENT NOTICE TO CUSTOMERS AND CLIENTS

                      30/03/2020

                      Our business is still operating at full pace but we will be shutting our doors to the general public from midday on 30th March 2020 for public health reasons.

                      Tenants

                      Most of our operations can be accessed from our website, www.hughreilly.com.au, but if you need to pick up or drop off keys, ring the office and pre-arrange it. We can accept documents by email at   to save you a trip.

                      Landlords

                      Please ring the office and we can help with any of your enquiries  - (07) 4957 7373

                      Tradespeople

                      Please ring to pre-arrange the transfer of keys or documents – (07) 4957 7373

                      URGENT NOTICE TO CUSTOMERS AND CLIENTS

                      30/03/2020

                      Our business is still operating at full pace but we will be shutting our doors to the general public from midday on 30th March 2020 for public health reasons.

                      Tenants

                      Most of our operations can be accessed from our website, www.hughreilly.com.au, but if you need to pick up or drop off keys, ring the office and pre-arrange it. We can accept documents by email at   to save you a trip.

                      Landlords

                      Please ring the office and we can help with any of your enquiries  - (07) 4957 7373

                      Tradespeople

                      Please ring to pre-arrange the transfer of keys or documents – (07) 4957 7373